The Illness is the Cure: The Forgotten Wisdom of Our Psychological Symptoms

I always liked the saying “The illness is the cure”. Why? Because in the area of mental health, it alerts us to something profoundly insightful about the nature of the psychological and emotional problems most people struggle with.

Whether we feel depressed, have panic attacks, or generally feel weak, bad, or inadequate, these kinds of problematic states and ways of suffering are rarely ever simply problems to be removed or eradicated. They are NOT the illness, but like a fever or a cough, a symptom that alerts us to something about our life or our approach to life that is off-kilter, wrong, or in need of change.

Like the red lamps on the dashboard of a car, they alert us to the problem, but are not themselves the problem.

The Fallacy of Treating the Symptom as the Cause:

There is a real fallacy here that many people fall into if they do not realize this nature of their psychological distress.

If they simply think of their anxiety or their depression as the problem, then they might try to medicate the symptom to the exclusion of finding out why the symptom is really there.

In some sense this approach would be tantamount to attempting to solve a car issue by smashing the red light on the dashboard.

However, when you realize that the psyche uses the symptom of depression or anxiety to alert us to the fact that it is ill or that something in our life needs to change, our symptom becomes more of a friend than a foe. It now serves as a calling to resolve an issue which we may have been avoiding or which has stumped us in some way.

As in the saying “the illness is the cure” it serves merely as the first step toward the cure, and as such it is in fact the first step toward a transformation and reorganization that needs to occur for balance and health to be restored.

Way too often, we short-circuit this natural healing process because we get frightened by the calling and can’t see the road ahead. We mistake the symptom for the cause, and the burgeoning cure for the illness itself.

Discovering the Truth of Our Symptoms:

There is a depth of understanding that has gotten lost in our current search for quick fixes and immediate happiness, but was always there in the minds of the founders of the craft we now call psychotherapy.

A psychiatrist like Carl Jung, for example, beautifully wrote about heeding our symptoms as a calling:

“Depression”, he said, “is like a woman in black. If she turns up, don’t shoo her away. Invite her in, offer her a seat, treat her like a guest and listen to what she wants to say.”

Carl Jung

Carl Jung

Even poets have alerted us to the fact that our distress is merely a signpost toward making necessary changes. As Rainer Marie Rilke writes:

“Why do you want to shut out of your life any uneasiness, any misery, any depression, since after all you don’t know what work these conditions are doing inside you? … If there is anything unhealthy in your reactions, just bear in mind that sickness is the means by which an organism frees itself from what is alien; so one must simply help it to be sick, to have its whole sickness and to break out with it, since that is the way it gets better.”

Rainer Maria Rilke

Rainer Maria Rilke

Sigmund Freud, too, reminded us of the danger of not listening to our symptoms, for as he rightly warns us:

“Unexpressed emotions will never die. They are buried alive and will come forth later in uglier ways”

Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud

The Calling of Symptoms is to “Know Thyself”:

So much gets lost when we don’t heed the advice to listen to our symptoms and pursue them as the first step toward a cure.

Depression, anxiety, badness, and upset, cures itself once its truth is understood and its emotional conflicts disentangled.

The calling of mental illness is to “know thyself”.

The calling is not for a dimming of your awareness through medication, quick fixes, or a rush to premature action, but for an expansion of your consciousness, so you can reap the benefits of your psyche’s own wisdom, and find out more about what is meaningful and central to you at your core.

Illness is not a destination, but a way-station, and those who dare to unlock its message will be amply rewarded and transformed in the process.

image of psychodynamic therapist, Dr. Rune MoelbakAbout me: I am Rune Moelbak, Ph.D. psychologist in Houston, TX. I help people work through their symptoms of anxiety and depression to achieve a transformation to a better, lighter, and more centered self. Visit my website for more information. 

Why Talking to a Psychotherapist is Not Like Talking to a Friend (And Other Misconceptions)

Recently I came across an excellent video on some of the common misperceptions many people have about psychotherapy that might stop them from ever seeing a therapist.

As the short video below from my colleagues at the The School of Life in London illustrates, these myths include:

  • Psychotherapy is only for people who are strange, abnormal, or deficient in some way

  • Psychotherapy is only for people who don’t know how to solve their own problems

  • Psychotherapy is nothing different than simply talking to a good friend

  • Psychotherapy is not affordable and is not worth the cost

In this article I will tell you why these four statements are misconceptions, and why you should not be so quick to dismiss the benefits of meeting with a well-trained professional psychotherapist.

But before we get there, first watch the video:

As you can see from the video, psychotherapy is frequently not what people think it is…

Let’s examine some of the myths about therapy a little further:

4 Myths that Might Stop You from Seeing a Psychotherapist:

Misconception #1: Psychotherapy is for People Who are Abnormal

green frog representing abnormality

Psychotherapy can make us feel like a misfit of society

One of the most liberating ideas I was presented with as a student of psychotherapy was the idea that all humans struggle. As the famous psychodynamic therapist Nancy McWilliams has pointed out, the question to ask yourself and others is not: Are you crazy? But rather: How crazy are you? and crazy in what way?  

This is in many ways the basic premise of psychodynamic psychotherapy: We all have our little neuroses, traits, or peculiarities that get in the way of living the life we wish we could live. We are all a little crazy and a little irrational at times. We all have some fears that other’s don’t. And we all get into situations that overwhelm us, make us fall short, or make us doubt ourselves.

Maybe we find ourselves dating the same type of ill-suited partner over and over or making the same relationship mistakes.

Or perhaps we find it hard to express our needs to anybody in authority, which creates problems at work, or make us sabotage our own success by turning assignments in late.

Whatever the situation may be, we all have something we struggle with that works against our better interest.

The only thing that distinguishes a person who seeks out psychotherapy from someone who doesn’t is therefore their willingness and courage to face the inherent struggles of their human existence.

The distinction is therefore not between someone normal and someone abnormal, but between someone who chooses to hide their abnormality behind the semblance of normality, and someone who recognizes that abnormality is normal and therefore gives themselves permission face their life as it is, not as they wish it to be.

Misconception #2: I Should Be Able to Solve My Own Problems

two pieces of a puzzle

We can often feel like we have failed if we cannot solve our problems of our own

Okay, so now that you have recognized that all humans struggle, you no longer need to distort your own reality to try to fit in to some illusory idea of what is normal.

However, you may still feel a little ill at ease about asking somebody else to help you with your problems.

Why? Because our culture in general often ascribes strength to the ability to fix-it-yourself.

Many people feel like it is a sign of weakness to not be able to handle whatever issues they are facing on their own. Instead of going to see a psychotherapist many people will therefore instead try out self-help books, or resort to self-made coping mechanisms such as alcohol and drugs, avoidance techniques, or putting on a forced smile.

However, a psychotherapist can accomplish something with you that it would be difficult if not impossible to accomplish on your own.

In fact a psychotherapist will not just listen and try to offer up new suggestions or solutions. Instead they will help you discover new thoughts and feelings that you have not been paying attention to or may have pushed out of your awareness. In this way they will help carry you beyond your own conscious knowledge of your problems, and will help you see and experience yourself in a new way.

In many ways, psychotherapy is really a process of standing back from your problems to see the bigger picture. Rather than offering solutions to the problems you think you have, psychotherapy helps you view your problems in a new way, so that the solutions you think you wanted, may not actually be the one’s you want.

Psychotherapy is therefore not a linear process of solving a problem, but a transformation of the very way to you experience yourself and your problems. It changes the context within which you view yourself, so that your very desires, needs, and wants may change.

The idea that you should be able to solve your own problems does not apply when it comes to matters of your psychological existence. The solution here is not one you can arrive at simply by applying logic to a known problem.  Instead, it involves a dialogue with someone who can listen in a different way based on parallel thinking, association, and the logic of the irrational, and can help you expand your awareness of things you didn’t know before.

Misconception #3: I Might as Well Just Talk to a Friend

two people holding hands

Can’t I just talk to a friend in stead of a therapist?

A friend and a psychotherapist are two very different characters.

We all can benefit from talking to friends. However, as many people often instinctively know, friends frequently don’t really offer the kind of listening and attentiveness that helps us feel comfortable opening up about our deepest fears and most embarrassing quirks.

This is why one of the first training goals for new students of psychotherapy is to unlearn their instinctive ways of responding as a friend.

Friends often do well-intentioned things that psychotherapists have learned are not really helpful.

As friends we often offer encouragement to help others not feel so bad about things. We try to cheer them up by telling them that things will be fine, or giving them reasons why they they should not feel sad, or guilty, or what have you. However, this inadvertently sends the message to the other person that we can’t tolerate or don’t want to hear about their pain, and that their pain is “irrational” or silly.

As friends we also often offer advice based on our own experience of what has worked for us, but such advise is often premature and ill suited for a person with other values and inclinations than our own. If you are honest with yourself, how often do you really find other people’s advice helpful? Most of the time, only when a part of you was already kind of thinking about doing the thing you friend has suggested. More often, however, advice simply feels invalidating and infantilizing. If our problems were so simple that we could simply solve them by following some piece of advice, we could probably have thought of the solution on our own.

An excellent video that illustrates why advice and encouragement is really not that helpful is Brene Brown‘s video on the difference between sympathy and empathy:

Finally as the video from The School of Life illustrated, friends most likely don’t have the deep understanding psychotherapists have about the complexities of human nature and the “normality of abnormality”. Friends therefore often have more limited views of what is acceptable, normal, and good and less tolerance for what is outside the cultural norm in our society or our immediate friendship groups. It therefore often does not feel that safe to admit to feelings or thoughts that may not be in line with what we think others deem to be acceptable or normal.

A psychotherapist on the contrary has a discipline to how they listen, how they respond, and how they make sense of what we say. They don’t make premature conclusions, don’t offer premature advice, and don’t shut down explorations of the aberrant or what lies outside of cultural standards of good and bad. This means they can meet us where we are, tolerate a wider range of our emotions, and help us expand our own knowledge and awareness of what we really think, feel, and want, even when we can’t quite accept these things about ourselves.

Misconception #4: Psychotherapy is Too Expensive

piggy bank with christmas lights

Is psychotherapy really worth the investment?

It is true that psychotherapy can often be quite costly. This is both because good psychotherapists need a lot of training, and because psychotherapy by nature is a very time and labor intensive process.

When it comes time to consider whether therapy is really worth the expense, it is often helpful to consider the value you place on living a life of greater self-knowledge and awareness. For some people this kind of life is not really a priority, and for those psychotherapy will almost always feel too expensive.

If, on the other hand, you value living a more conscious life, you will feel less hesitant to see it as a worthwhile investment and will almost always be able to find room within your budget to see a psychotherapist.

At the end of the day it is often not the price of psychotherapy that is prohibitive, but the value you place on it.

Some people will easily spend thousands of dollars on a vacation, or will not hesitate to get Lasik surgery for their eyes, or Invisalign for their teeth, but will not want to spend the same kind of money on their mental and psychological well-being.

However, as the video from the School of Life makes it clear, life is not a skill we instinctively master, but a skill we have to learn. This in my book, makes psychotherapy an essential ingredient of any person’s quest to live a more fulfilling life.

image of psychodynamic therapist, Dr. Rune MoelbakAbout me: I am Rune Moelbak, Ph.D., psychologist and psychodynamic psychotherapist in Houston, Texas. I help people get to the root of the problems that are causing them distress so they can live more fulfilling lives.

 

Avoiding a Painful Past: To Leave a Place You Must First Arrive

The title of my blog post this week contains one of the essential insights of my work as a psychologist.

Too many people spend their lives leaving places they have never actually arrived at.

A person who had a traumatic childhood might say they would rather just forget about the past and move on, which is their way of leaving without first arriving.

Another person might spend their entire life in a search for meaning on the mountain tops of Nepal or in the pursuits of promotions or recognition at work, which is their way of not addressing the source of an emptiness, but simply displacing it into an ever elusive ambition of becoming someone better or of transcending themselves. They spend their entire life leaving a place without really fully understanding the place they are trying to leave.

Neurosis and Human GrowthAs the now deceased psychoanalyst Karen Horney has written about in her excellent book “Neurosis and Human Growth”, many people lose themselves in the empty pursuit of a never-ending self-improvement, and end up living an entire life trying to become someone other than themselves. They lose their life on what she calls the altar of glory, that is, in the pursuit of a better version of themselves that is really just another way to abandon a confrontation with the hurts of their own past.

The outcome of such a driven pursuit to simply move on without fully understanding that from which one is trying to move on, is a loss of a kind of happiness that comes from feeling rooted in one’s history and grounded within oneself.

The Price We Pay for Trying to Escape from Our Past:

So many people nowadays come to therapy complaining that they don’t really know what they are passionate about, or saying that their lives feel meaningless. Maybe they report feeling like a machine, and not really having access to the flow of emotions that would make them feel alive. Or maybe they report feeling lost and confused, empty inside, and in search of a purpose.

These are the symptoms of leaving without first arriving.

They announce to us that we are not in touch with ourselves, that we have taken leave of ourselves before first accepting the struggles, traumas, memories, or feelings that would allow us to work through our issues without abandoning ourselves. They are signs that we have attempted to leave ourselves by numbing ourselves, tuning out, avoiding, or prematurely conforming. They are signs that we have paid the price of trying to get somewhere safer and better by leaving our “luggage” behind or by leaving painful pieces of ourselves behind in our unprocessed and unresolved past.

But we can’t leave a place simply by avoiding it. We must first “say our goodbyes”.

Leaving Pain Behind Is an Active Process:

Truly leaving a place that feels unpleasant, overwhelming, shaming, or traumatic is an active process of facing and confronting that which haunts us.

To face and confront a belief about oneself, an emotional reality, or a painful memory we must first accept it.

Only when we accept that which we have tried to leave behind can we begin the active process of mourning our losses, shedding our tears, developing compassion for ourselves, or expressing anger at others for what we needed from them but never got. This kind of emotional repair work is only possible when we truly arrive at those places which we wish to leave behind.

Leaving can now become an active emotional process, rather than an avoidance that simply shuts out by shutting ourselves out.

Experiencing Transformation Through Our Emotions:

In the realm of emotions, getting away from something is paradoxically only possible by going into it.

Only by going into that which is unpleasant or overwhelming or distasteful, do we realize that we can come out on the other side with new realizations about ourselves. If we truly enter into our emotions, like one would ride a wave, we will see that emotions have a way to carry us to new shores. They don’t have to become stuck places in our lives, but can be starting points for truly working through sadness, anger, loneliness, and despair.

Rainer Marie Rilke: Austrian Existentialist Poet

Rainer Marie Rilke: Austrian Existentialist Poet

As the poet Rainer Marie Rilke writes:

“Where something becomes extremely difficult and unbearable, there we also stand already quite near its transformation”

And transformation through going through the motion of our emotion is exactly what is needed in order to leave a place.

Discovering the Joy of Our Aliveness:

By working our emotions through to completion rather than short-circuiting them in an effort to leave them behind, we can let our suffering transform us and in turn transform our suffering.

The Transforming Power of AffectDiana Fosha, for example, has found that clients who truly work through their emotions in therapy, experience a variety of transformational affects, like a sense of mastery, curiosity, confidence, joy, pride, and compassion. People report feeling moved and touched, or experiencing amazement and wonder. They no longer feel weighed down by the pain, or blemished by their past, but instead feel “lighter”, shed tears of joy, and get filled with tenderness toward themselves and others.

These kinds of shifts are signs that we are rediscovering who we really are instead of spending our life running from ourselves. They are signs that we are getting in touch with an aliveness and resilience within, and that growth brings about a joy that avoidance can never obtain.

They are signs that we are finally leaving a place that we have truly arrived at, and that we no longer have to abandon ourselves in order to find peace and comfort with who we are.

image of psychodynamic therapist, Dr. Rune MoelbakAbout Me: I am Rune Moelbak, Ph.D., Psychologist in Houston Texas. I help people arrive at their past so they can truly leave it behind instead of spending their life running from themselves.

 

Ways to Deal with Heartache and Heartbreak

No feeling is so painful as the pain of the human heart…

One client of mine, when asked what it was like to feel shut out and rejected by her partner, used the word “soul-crunching” to describe her pain

In fact heartache and heartbreak are often described by people through metaphors of brokenness.

Heartache and heartbreak literally destroy something inside of us. We feel as if we have fallen to pieces, as if our lives are in ruins, and as if who we are and what we live for is no longer intact.

What Science Says:

Research shows that heart-ache and heart-break are not just painful experiences metaphorically speaking, but that they literally impact the same parts of the brain as physical pain. So when we say our heart is hurting, it literally is.

What You Need to Know about Heartache and Heartbreak:

Heartbreak, which describes the pain of a break-up, and heartache which is a more general description of the pain in the heart we feel when someone we love dies, are similar in many ways to the term “psycheache” which is a term used to describe the pain of being alive often reported by people who are suicidal.

All three terms express a pain of existing which only humans can feel. And there are really only two responses to deal with it. We can shrivel in the face of it and try our best to avoid it, or we can enter into it and become wiser from it.

The Two Ways to Deal with the Pain of a Broken Heart:

Avoiding the Pain:

The pain of heartache and heartbreak is so difficult to tolerate that our natural instinct is to want to run from it.

We run from the pain in different ways:

If we have just broken up with someone who matters a great deal to us, it might be tempting to simply get involved with another person and skip the the painstaking process of grieving the loss. However, a broken heart is not ready to love again before it has healed, and healing takes time. This is why a rebound relationship is never the best way to deal with a broken heart.

Another way we may distract ourselves is to simply keep busy and try to distract ourselves through activities, projects, work, or being social. In this approach, we simply try to never be alone or never fully stay long enough in the moment, to truly feel our pain. Of course, such a flight from ourselves, is bound to fail in the long run. Since we are not really dealing with the pain, the healing process never really begins, and we just end up postponing the inevitable.

A third way to deal with gut-wrenching pain is to shut the grieving process down by numbing ourselves to our emotions and hardening our heart. The pain of living is here dealt with by becoming a little less alive. While this might feel preferable to feeling the pain of existing, the long-term price of this strategy is steep, and we often end up feeling alienated and cut off from everything good life has to offer.

Learning from the Pain:

Because every attempt to simply avoid our pain is destined to fail in the long-run or to come with a heavy price tag, a wiser path to follow is to heed the message of the broken heart itself.

If you do this what you will discover is the following: Your heart is broken because you dared to love and let others matter.

Now in the absence of your loved one, you have lost a piece of yourself and are no longer whole. Your existence, without the other person, no longer feels full or sufficient. Love opened up life’s riches, and now that it has closed these riches down, the pain you feel is the pain of the absence and meaninglessness of a life without such love.

And although your heart is trying to warn you not hurry back into the same kind of vulnerability that left you bereft, it has also just revealed the meaningfulness, joy, and value of a life of mattering to someone and letting someone matter to you.

Its message is therefore not to avoid loving, but to take the time to reflect on the big questions brought about by the encounter with the inevitable pain and joy of an open heart.

  • What has loving and losing revealed to you about what is really important in life?
  • What has it revealed to you about yourself and about others?
  • Did you make mistakes and do you have regrets?
  • What lessons can you carry with you into your next relationship?

Only if you fully go into these often painful and quite dizzying questions about the meaning of your life, do you unlock the wisdom contained within your heartbreak.

Then you will live to love again, and be a little more prepared for the inevitable heartaches and heartbreaks of life.

Empty Hearts and Full Hearts:

 As Jon Fredrickson, a social worker and practicing psychodynamic therapist has said:

The person whose heart has been broken and gives up loving ends up with an empty heart.

The person with a broken heart who continues to love has a full heart, knowing that everyone we love we lose through death or abandonment.

That is why there are only two kinds of hearts: empty hearts and loving hearts.

It takes courage to face the inevitable losses and yet, in spite of it all, to keep on loving and being open to life

(Source: Jon Frederickson: Co-Creating Change)

image of psychodynamic therapist, Dr. Rune MoelbakAbout Me: I am Rune Moelbak, Ph.D., psychologist and psychodynamic therapist in Houston Texas. I help people move through their difficult emotions to find greater peace and comfort with who they are. Visit: www.bettertherapy.com for more information. 

The Allure of The Image

At my last visit to my hair stylist, I happened to pick up a recent copy of a glamour magazine and haphazardly flipped through the pages, mostly out of boredom.

Although I know I did not exactly have a Eureka moment, I was struck by the fact that in image after image, as I perused the pages, I saw only smiling faces. These looked like people who were having the time of their life and who had discovered the closest thing to the bliss the Buddha was talking about.

For some reason my eyes were drawn to an article about Joan Collins, the famous Dynasty actress, who apparently has a quite enthralling estate in France. She showed it all to the reader with her smiling “hubby” by her side.

It struck me how alluring this depiction of life is. These are people who have it all. They have become the image of what so many people strive for: happiness, success, beauty, wealth, everlasting love.

And yet as I began to look closer, I noticed sudden cracks in the image of perfection. Joan Collins is aging and reminding me that the Joan Collins of Dynasty is a mortal. You could notice the faint contours of liver spots on her skin and none of the make-up could conceal her many wrinkles. I was particularly attuned to her signs of aging, because I myself recently had to come to terms with the inevitable loss of youth. Noticing my first gray hairs and the beginning signs of balding have recently forced me reckon with the fact that I am middle-aged, not everlastingly young.

The Illusory Pursuit of the Image:

Why is the idea of the image such an important source of allure and suffering in human existence?

The allure of the image is in some sense the allure of something eternal and unchanging; some kind of end state that we can arrive at or merge with.

An image, like a photograph, is immutable, just like a concept or an idea. It is in the realm of images that we can imagine things like true love, everlasting beauty, success, and so on. In the realm of the image, these are attainable states, or qualities people can possess, and we often aspire to merge with these attributes, to become them, or acquire them.

And yet life as the Buddha reminded us is not static, but always changing. Nothing ever stays the same. We never stay the same. And so the image in human existence is really an illusion. It is an aspiration Sigmund Freud might talk about as a death instinct: the desire to return to a non-human form, which is really antithetical to life.

The Image and Jaques Lacan:

Psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan talked a lot about the problems that come from identifying ourselves with an image. He pointed out that our internal experience is really quite shifting and fragmented, but that we learn to identify ourselves as a thing in the world through having our image reflected back to us in the mirror or by other people.  He identified a specific developmental stage around 6 months of age when the child first begins to think of him or herself as that person in the mirror.

The problem with this identification is that it betrays a truth about us, which is that we are never really a unitary whole, never really fixed in our nature like the image would convey. The pursuit of becoming a static image therefore is at odds with life and a source of great suffering.

Lacan pointed out that what distinguishes us as human beings is that we live in a symbolic reality, or a reality of meaning, and this fact is both what makes images possible, and robs us of ever becoming one with them.

symbolism

The symbol’s frustration of our attainment of our ideals

Words, like mathematical symbols, are never fixed in what they refer to: 1 + 1 can apply to apples as well as people, and the word “successful” can be attached to multiple different images, and can even mean different things at different times for different people. This slippery nature of symbols means that we never quite arrive at the final destination that we can dream about or aspire to: The idea of something, and the experience of that idea never quite merge. Because the symbol offers us a meaning rather than an “edible”, there is never really anything at the end of the rainbow. We can never really sink our teeth into the image.

Learning from Celebrities:

This is probably also why there are no shortage of examples of people who seemed to have it all but who ultimately ended up self-destructing. Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Michael Jackson, Eazy-E, or even Brittany Spears all ended up discontent and unfulfilled. Perhaps what is different about them and the average Joe is that they were forced to confront the fact that the image always alludes us.

learning from celebrities

What can we learn from the self-destructive habits of celebrities who seem to have it all?

Many people find solace and hope in the dream about the image. How often don’t we hear people say things like: When I win the lottery I will quit my job and move to the Caribbean. They have the comfort of a different life as a possibility: the life they read about or dream about.

But people who have actually lived the dream, and still find the image eluding them are in a different quandary. Either they have to up the ante (such as perhaps run for president once they have already proven that they are successful in business) (wink wink), or confront the truth that images are illusions, and that life will always rob us of the satisfaction that would come from merging with our dream.

Perhaps that is why Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, and Michael Jackson turned to drugs. They had to find a way to escape the realization that they couldn’t run from themselves. That at the end of the day they are mortal, they age, and they don’t get more than simple and temporary enjoyments from the images they so want to be.

A life in pursuit of an image is in this sense a wasted life, because it is the pursuit of something that can never satisfy, or that is always elusive.

The Take Away:

As people we are ever changing, and we are different from the still perfection of the images we see around us on TV, hear about from others on Facebook, or attribute to others based on their appearance or our own projections.

I will not say that I have attained the wisdom to live my life in accordance with this truth, but life teaches us this lesson sooner or later, as my own confrontation with aging has made it apparent.

The only question left for us to wrestle with is whether we can accept this fact, or want to spend our life fighting it.

image of psychodynamic therapist, Dr. Rune MoelbakAbout Me: I am Rune Moelbak, Ph.D., a psychologist in Houston, TX. I help people find ways to be more authentically themselves. Visit my website: www.bettertherapy.com to learn more.